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Autodiscovery

This version was saved 12 years, 2 months ago View current version     Page history
Saved by Chris Messina
on May 12, 2009 at 3:12:47 am
 

ATOM feeds (RFC 4287) are an alternative representation of content flowing on a page — typically reverse-chronological posts of some sort — like blog posts. Autodiscovery of these feeds is made possible through a <link> tag in the head of the HTML document:

<link rel="alternate" type="application/atom+xml" href="/http://www.example.com/xml/index.atom" />

To aid in discovery of activity streams, a couple options have been presented:

  1. <link rel="activitystream" type="application/atom+xml" href="/http://www.example.com/xml/index.atom" /> or <link rel="alternate activitystream" type="application/atom+xml" href="/http://www.example.com/xml/index.atom" />
  2. <link rel="alternate" type="application/atom+xml" href="/http://www.example.com/xml/index.atom" class="activitystream" />

Though it is possible to point to a stream for comments on a given blog post, let's say, there's no way to indicate that it's actually a comment feed (except in the human-friendly title):

<link rel="alternate" type="application/atom+xml" href="/http://www.example.com/xml/comments.atom" title="Recent comments feed" />

It may not be necessary to call out the activitystream type of feed, but seems useful to make it easier to provide a hint to aggregators that a particular feed can be consumed as an activity stream.

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